Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1105

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1132

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1093

Warning: Illegal string offset 'status_txt' in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/114651/domains/thesocialsilo.com/html/wp-content/plugins/share-and-follow/share-and-follow.php on line 1122

I kind of like working indoors, where it’s warm and I can sit at my office desk and drink coffee most of the day. That’s especially true in a week like the one just beginning, when nighttime temperatures are forecast to be in the single digits and daytime temps will struggle to top 20.

I have it pretty good in a room that averages 70 degrees. But I have to admit, I always long for the weekend to come, so I can go outside.

This past weekend was a good time to be outdoors — at least Saturday — when it topped 50 degrees with sunshine. I loaded my chain saw and cutting gear into the trunk of my new car — careful to put down a layer of plastic first — and headed south to one of my grandparent’s farms where I met my brother and cut firewood all afternoon.

It was such a good feeling to be outdoors working in the middle of January, even though my muscles reminded me when I was done, that it had been a while since I worked that hard. I saw several other people the same day who were headed to their woodlots to cut wood.

It’s certainly not the first time this winter I’ve ventured across the back forty. I’ve been hunting deer or rabbits most weekends since November, and I’ll usually hunt through anything except for heavy rain.

Getting out

Even when it’s 10 degrees — like it’s going to be later this week — I still long to get outdoors. It takes a few more layers, but if dressed right, it still feels good. On days when it’s that cold, I try to work in areas where the trees are thick and help to block some of the wind. It makes a big difference on a cold and windy day, when you’re deep in a woods and the brush and trunks of other trees make everything nearly still. I think the wildlife know this, too, because their tracks and their markings are always more abundant in these deep, sheltered places.

Nothing new

If you’re a livestock farmer, you’re probably used to being outdoors every day anyway, and if anything, would like to be indoors a little more. I don’t blame you. It’s no fun at all to be outside breaking ice out of a trough or stream, or caring for giving animals shots when you can barely feel your fingers.

I have at least one farm that I’m visiting this week, that I’m considering calling ahead just to confirm that everything is OK, and that they still want to be interviewed. With a daytime temperature of only 11 degrees, the owners could easily have their hands full with other things. The tractor that won’t start, the waterlines that are frozen or worse.

On most cold days, though, I still enjoy getting out onto farms and walking around for the interview. I have a heavy Carhartt jacket and a Carhartt pullover hat that I reserve mostly for my job — especially in the dead of winter. Coupled with a pair of gloves that I use only for reporting, this keeps me warm, and about as clean and professional looking as I can be, considering the elements.

On most days I prefer to wear a leather jacket or maybe a black Polo jacket, but when it’s freezing cold, you wear what you have to and what works. Fortunately in my profession, when you wear a Carhartt jacket and a pair of Red Wing boots to work, you’re probably going to fit in just fine.

The thing I cannot stand is being pent-up in the house for several days.

Don’t pen me up!

I get cabin fever too easily, and I gotta get out. There are days when I’ve gone out, and later wished I would have stayed in. Like when there’s a foot of snow in the fields and I end up stuck and spending half the day shoveling myself out. Those days are no fun.

But, sometimes it’s worth the risk. To see what’s going on down the road or across the field, or in the woods. I’ve felt like this many times and I’m sure I will by the end of this week, if it stays cold.

Is your job mostly indoors, or is it a combination of both? What is your least favorite chore to do this time of year? What kinds of things will you be doing this week to prepare for the cold that’s expected to come?

Chris Kick lives in Wooster, Ohio. An American FFA Degree recipient, he holds a bachelor’s in creative writing from Ashland University. He spends his free time on his grandparents’ farms in Wayne and Holmes counties.
Chris Kick
View all posts by Chris Kick

Related posts: